CORE releases a new API version

We are very proud to announce that CORE has now released CORE API 2.0. The new API offers new opportunities for developers to make use of the CORE open access aggregator in their applications.

The main new features are:

  • Support for looking up articles by a global identifier (DOI, OAI, arXiv, etc.) instead of just CORE ID.
  • Access to new resource types, repositories and journals, and organisation of API methods according to the resource type.
  • Enables accessing the original metadata exactly as it was harvested from the repository of origin.
  • Supports the retrieval of the changes of the metadata as it was harvested by CORE.
  • Provides the possibility of retrieving citations extracted from the full-text by CORE.
  • Support for batch request for searching, recommending, accessing full-texts, harvesting history, etc.

The goals of the new API also include improving scalability, cleaning up and unifying the API responses and making it easier for developers to start working with it.

The API is implemented and documented using Swagger, which has the advantage that anybody can start playing with the API directly from our online client. The documentation of the API v2.0 is available and the API is currently in beta. Those interested to register for a new API key can do so by completing the online form.

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CORE among the top 10 search engines for research that go beyond Google

Using search engines effectively is now a key skill for researchers, but could more be done to equip young researchers with the tools they need? Here, Dr Neil Jacobs and Rachel Bruce from JISC’s digital infrastructure team shared their top ten resources for researchers from across the web. CORE was placed among the top 10 search engines that go beyond Google.

More information on the JISC’s website.

Related content recommendation for EPrints

We have released the first version of a content recommendation package for EPrints available via the EPrints Bazaar ( http://bazaar.eprints.org/ ). The functionality is offered through CORE and can be seen, for example, in Open Research Online EPrints ( http://oro.open.ac.uk/36256/ ) or on the European Library portal ( http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/tel4/record/2000004374192?query=data+mining ). I was wonderring if any EPrints repository manager would be interested to get in touch to test this in his/her repository. As the
package is available via the EPrints Bazaar, the installation requires just a few clicks. We would be grateful for any suggestions for improvements and also for information regarding how this could be effectively provided to DSpace and Fedora repositories.

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Final blog post

The main idea of this blog post is to provide a summary of the CORE outputs produced over the last 9 months and report the lessons learned.

Outputs

The outputs can be divided into (a) technical, (b) content and service and (c) dissemination outputs.

(a) Technical outputs

According to our project management software, to this day, we have resolved 214 issues. Each issue corresponds to a new function or a fixed bug. In this section we will describe the new features and improvements we have developed. The technology on which the system is built has been decribed in our previous blog post.

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Technical Approach

In the last six months, CORE has made a huge step forward in terms of the technology solution. According to our project management software, to this day, we have resolved 214 issues. Each issue corresponds to a new function or a fixed bug.

The idea of this blog post is to provide an overview of the technologies and standards CORE is using and to report on the experience we had with them during the development of CORE in the last months. We will provide more information about the new features and enhancements in the following blog posts.

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CORE Fight for Open Access in Scotland!

The 7th International Conference on Open Repositories (OR 2012) has seen last week close to 500 participants, the highest number in its history. The theme and title of OR 2012 in Edinburgh – Open Services for Open Content: Local In for Global Out – reflects the current move towards open content, ‘augmented content’, distributed systems and data delivery infrastructures. A very good fit with what CORE (core.kmi.open.ac.uk) offers.

The CORE system developed in KMi had a very active presence. Petr Knoth has presented different aspects of the CORE system in a presentation, at a poster session (with Owen Stephens) and also during the developers challenge. CORE has been also discussed in a number of presentations by other participants not directly linked to the Open University. Perhaps the most important case being the UK RepositoryNet+ project presentation. UK RepositoryNet+ is a socio-technical infrastructure funded by JISC supporting deposit, curation & exposure of Open Access research literature. UK RepositoryNet+ aims to provide a stable socio-technical infrastructure at the network-level to maximize value to UK HE of that investment by supporting a mix of distributed and centrally delivered service components within pro-active management, operation, support and outcome. While this infrastructure will be designed to meet the needs of UK research, it is set and must operate effectively within a global context. UK RepositoryNet+ considers the CORE system as an important component in this infrastructure.

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Users and use cases

The last 10 years have seen a massive increase in the amounts of Open Access publications available in journals and institutional repositories. The open presence of large volumes of state-of-the-art knowledge online has the potential to provide huge savings and benefits in many fields. However, in order to fully leverage this knowledge, it is necessary to develop systems that (a) make it easy for users to discover, explore and access this knowledge at the level of individual resources, (b) explore and analyse this knowledge at the level of collections of resources and (c) provide infrastructure and access to raw data in order to lower the barriers to the research and development of systems and services on top of this knowledge. The CORE system is trying to address these issues by providing the necessary infrastructure.

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