Releasing a new CORE Discovery browser extension

CORE Discovery helps users find freely accessible copies of research papers that might be behind a paywall on the publisher’s website. It is backed by our huge dataset of millions of full text open access papers as well as content from widely used external services beyond CORE. The tool not only provides state-of-the-art coverage of freely available content, it is the only discovery service which:

  • delivers state-of-the-art performance compared to other discovery tools in terms of both content coverage (finding a freely available copy when it is available) and precision (reliably delivering a free copy of the paper on success);
  • is run by researchers for researchers (as opposed to companies);
  • has the best grip on content from the global network of open repositories;
  • can deliver to readers other relevant freely available research papers even in situations where a freely available version is not available from anywhere on the web.

To satisfy the needs of CORE users, the world’s largest global aggregator of open access research papers now helps users access articles of their interest. Generally, discovery tools can find typically free copies of papers for about 15%-30% of published documents (slide 11). This means that in more than 70% of cases, they don’t bring to the user anything useful. CORE Discovery can offer the user relevant documents even in situations where other discovery tools are not successful. What distinguishes CORE Discovery from other discovery services on the market is that it does not stop when an open access version is not available, but always aims to offer related open access articles to the end user. read more...

CORE update for July to September 2019

CORE releases CORE Discovery in Mozilla and Opera browsers

CORE Discovery, a browser extension that offers one-click access to free copies of research papers whenever you might hit a paywall, is now published in Mozilla and Opera Stores. The plug in was originally released as a Google Chrome extension.

CORE presents its full texts growth and introduces eduTDM at Open Science Fair 2019

CORE was active at the Open Science Fair 2019, an international event for all topics related to Open Science. CORE had two posters at this event; a general to the CORE service poster, which updated the community about the full text growth and wide usage of the CORE services, and a second one about the eduTDM. read more...

CORE update for April to June 2019

CORE releases CORE Discovery tool

CORE has released a BETA version of the CORE Discovery tool, which offers a one-click access to free copies of research papers whenever you might hit a paywall. 

CORE Discovery

Our free CORE Discovery service provides you with:

  • Highest coverage of freely available content. Our tests have shown CORE Discovery finding more free content than any other discovery system.
  • Free service for researchers by researchers. CORE Discovery is the only free content discovery extension developed by researchers for researchers. There is no major publisher or enterprise controlling and profiting from your usage data.
  • Best grip on open repository content. Due to CORE being a leader in harvesting open access literature, CORE Discovery has the best grip on open content from open repositories as opposed to other services that disproportionately focus only on content indexed in major commercial databases.
  • Repository integration and discovering documents without a DOI. The only service offering seamless and free integration into repositories. CORE Discovery is also the only discovery system that can locate scientific content even for items with an unknown DOI or which do not have a DOI.

The tool is available as:

  • A browser extension for researchers and anyone interested in reading scientific documents
  • Plugin for repositories, enriching metadata only pages in repositories with links to freely available copies of the paper
  • API for developers and third party services

If you are interested in the CORE Discovery plugin do get in touch

CORE receives Vannevar Bush Best Paper Award

Vannevar Bush Best Paper Award The CORE team has also won the Vannevar Bush Best Paper Award at JCDL 2019, one of the most highly recognised digital libraries conference in the world, for our work on analysing how soon authors deposit into repositories, which was driven by CORE data. A blog post about this is already available.
read more...

CORE becomes the world’s largest open access aggregator (or how about them stats 2018 edition)

This was another productive year for the CORE team; our content providers have increased, along with our metadata and full text records. This makes CORE the world’s largest open access aggregator

. More specifically, over the last 3 months CORE had more than 25 million users, tripling our usage compared to 2017. According to read more...

CORE’s Open Access content has reached the Moon! (or how about them stats 2017 edition)

For yet another year (see previous years 2016, 2015) CORE has been really productive; the number of  our content providers has increased and we have now more open access full text and metadata records than ever.

Our services are also growing steadily and we would like to thank the community for using the CORE API and CORE Datasets.

We also offer other services, such as the CORE Repositories Dashboard, CORE Publisher Connector and the CORE Recommender. We received great feedback with regards to the CORE Recommender, with George Macgregor, Institutional Repository Manager at Strathclyde University, reporting:

We are thrilled that this year CORE made it to the moon. Our next destination is Venus.

The CORE Team wishes you Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year!

* Note: Special thanks to Matteo Cancellieri for creating the graphics in this blog post.

CORE reaches a new milestone: 75 million metadata and 6 million full text

CORE is continuously growing. This month we have reached 75 million metadata and 6 million full of text scientific research articles harvested from both open access journals and repositories. This past February we reported 66 million metadata and 5 million full text articles, while at the end of December 2016 we had just over 4 million full text. This shows our continuous commitment to bring to our users the widest possible range of Open Access articles.

To celebrate this milestone, we gathered the knowledge of our data scientists, programmers, researchers, and designers to illustrate our portion of metadata and full text with a less traditional (sour apple) “pie chart”. read more...

CORE’s open access and text mining services – 2016 growth (or, how about them stats – 2016 edition)

The past year has been productive for the CORE team; the number of harvested repositories and our open access content, both in metadata and full-text, has massively increased. (You can see last year’s blog post with our 2015 achievements in numbers here.)

There was also progress with regards to our services; the number of our API users was almost doubled in 2016, we have now about 200 registered CORE Dashboard users, and this past October we released a new version of our recommender and updated our dataset.

Around this time of the year, the joyful Christmas spirit of the CORE team increases along with our numbers.  Thus, we decided to recalculate how far are the CORE research outputs – if we had printed them – from reaching the moon (last year we made it to 1/3 of the way).

We are thrilled to see that this year we got CORE even closer to the moon! We would also like to thank all our data providers, who have helped us reaching this goal.

Fear not, we will never print all our research outputs, we believe that their mission is to be discoverable on the web as open access. Plus we love trees.

Merry Christmas from the CORE Team!

* Note: Special thanks to Matteo Cancellieri for creating the CORE graphics.

 

How about them stats?

Every month Samuel Pearce, one of the CORE developers, collects the CORE statistics – perhaps a boring task, but useful for us to know where we stand as a service. A very brief report of the accumulative statistics of all years that CORE operates as a project, 2011 – 2015, are as follows.
Users can retrieve from CORE,

  • 25,363,829 metadata records and
  • 2,954,141 open access full-text records, 

from 689 repositories (institutional and subject) and 5,488 open access journals. In addition, 122 users have access to the CORE API

In the playful Christmas spirit we attempted this time to have some fun with the statistics.

Since we harvest outputs in other languages than English, we created a top 20 list of the languages that appear in CORE’s full-text manuscripts.

rect4333

We also investigated how much we have progressed in the amount of the harvested metadata.

metadata

And the amount of full-text we have in our collection.

fulltext
The metadata and harvest graph in XKCD style have been created based on this awesome python notebook by Jake Vanderplas.

You may have noticed that the numbers in the graphs do not exactly match the numbers presented above. This is due to many reasons; for example during the harvesting process CORE retrieves either records with different types of inconsistencies or duplicates that we do not count in the “official” CORE collection. In addition, the numbers in the graphs include the amount of deleted or disabled records by the source repository. Therefore, the graphs illustrate the numbers that we actually harvest in CORE (what we have in our database), while the records that we provide via our search engine have been filtered and thus they are a bit smaller.

Finally, we calculated where CORE’s collection would take us if we had printed all the full-text from our database in a A3 page. We discovered that all this paper would take us 1/3 of the way to the moon.

Our next mission is to collect more full-text, enough to take us to the moon!

Merry Christmas!

*Note: Special thanks to Matteo Cancellieri for creating the images and the graphs.