CORE visits Ethiopia and participates in an Open Science training session

EIFL’s invitation to CORE to take part in a workshop for researchers from developing countries pays dividends for participants and for CORE. 

In June 2017, EIFL invited the global open access full text aggregator CORE to take part in an Open Science train-the-trainer course for universities and research institutions in EIFL partner countries.

Watch the videos recorded during the workshop and read more

Solomon Mekonnen – Open Access Ethiopia 

Zaituni Kaijage – Open Access Tanzania read more...

Implementing the CORE Recommender in Strathprints: a “whitehat” improvement to promote user interaction

by George Macgregor, Institutional Repository Coordinator, University of Strathclyde

This guest blog post briefly reviews why the CORE Recommender was quickly adopted on Strathprints and how it has become a central part of our quest to improve the interactive qualities of repositories.

Back in October 2016 my colleagues at the CORE Team released their Recommender plugin. The CORE Recommender plugin can be installed on repositories and journal systems to recommend similar scholarly content. On this very blog, Nancy Pontika, Lucas Anastasiou and Petr Knoth, announced the release of the Recommender as a: read more...

CORE reaches a new milestone: 75 million metadata and 6 million full text

CORE is continuously growing. This month we have reached 75 million metadata and 6 million full of text scientific research articles harvested from both open access journals and repositories. This past February we reported 66 million metadata and 5 million full text articles, while at the end of December 2016 we had just over 4 million full text. This shows our continuous commitment to bring to our users the widest possible range of Open Access articles.

To celebrate this milestone, we gathered the knowledge of our data scientists, programmers, researchers, and designers to illustrate our portion of metadata and full text with a less traditional (sour apple) “pie chart”. read more...

Introducing the CORE interface for the R programming language

Update 19/06/2017: The CORE package has been renamed from “rcore” to “rcoreoa”.

The R programming language has come a long way from being mainly a data analysis powerhouse (R is a descendant of Bell Lab’s S language) to a general purpose language with the powerful features that we know today.

CORE and R have not been total strangers; the first release of the “rcore” package in February 2016 from rOpenSci provided the R users with an interface for CORE’s API. rOpenSci works towards providing access to data repositories through R and promotes maintainable and reproducible tools for scientific methods and analyses. read more...

CORE listed Number 1 in the list of top 21 free online journal and research databases

Image from the Scribendi website, 101 Free Online Journal and Research Databases for Academics.

An online editing and proofreading company, Scribendi, has recently put together a list of top 21 freely available online databases. It is a pleasure to see CORE listed as Number 1 resource in this list. CORE has been included in this list thanks to its large volume of open access and free of cost content, offering 66 million of bibliographic metadata records and 5 million of full-text research outputs. Our content originates from open access journals and repositories, both institutional and disciplinary and can be accessed via our search engine. In addition, we also offer an API and Datasets for programmable access to this content, enabling the development of new artificial intelligence-based applications for scientists and for carrying out text and data mining of scientific literature. read more...

CORE releases a new website version

A couple of days ago we released a new version of our website and if you visit our main page it now looks slightly different.

Image: blickpixel @ pixabay https://pixabay.com/en/lego-legomaennchen-males-workers-568039/

One of our aims was to showcase in a more clear way the CORE testimonials, i.e. what others think of the project and how the community uses our products, mainly our API and Datasets. In an effort to give credit to the universities and companies that are using our services, such as our Recommender and API, we are now displaying their logos on our main page. Our last new item is our research partners; CORE could not offer some of its services without co-operating with other projects, such as IRUS-UK, RIOXX and more. read more...

Recommender sunset period

We first released our EPrints recommender (previously called ‘CORE Widget’) in April 2013 and since then, have made many improvements to it and our recommendation systems. We blogged about our most recent changes which you can read about here.

As a result, it means that we will stop supporting old versions of the recommender. If you installed the recommender on or before the 10th October 2016, you will need to upgrade.

Any old version of the recommender will cease to work on Monday 20th February 2016. read more...

CORE’s open access and text mining services – 2016 growth (or, how about them stats – 2016 edition)

The past year has been productive for the CORE team; the number of harvested repositories and our open access content, both in metadata and full-text, has massively increased. (You can see last year’s blog post with our 2015 achievements in numbers here.)

There was also progress with regards to our services; the number of our API users was almost doubled in 2016, we have now about 200 registered CORE Dashboard users, and this past October we released a new version of our recommender and updated our dataset. read more...

Analysing ORCID coverage across repositories through CORE

* This post was authored by Matteo Cancellieri, Petr Knoth and Nancy Pontika.

Last month, CORE attended the JISC ORCID hackday events in Birmingham and London. (ORCID is a non-profit organisation that aims to solve the author disambiguation problem by offering unique author identifiers). Following the discussions that sparked off at the two events, we decided to test the CORE data towards ORCID’s API and we discovered some information that we think is of interest to the scholarly community. read more...