SoFAIR is live! Kickoff, progress and website launch

This spring saw the launch of the multi-national SoFAIR project (Making Software FAIR: A machine-assisted workflow for the research software lifecycle), coordinated by The Open University and involving teams from six institutions across 5 countries. The project is funded by a €494k research grant in the international CHISTERA Open Research Data & Software Call which aims to enhance the discoverability and reusability of open research software.

The consortium partners 

In January the SoFAIR project partners headed for the slightly chilly surroundings of Milton Keynes to gather for the SoFAIR project kick off meeting. The meeting took place over two days at the Walton Hall campus of The Open University and we were grateful to all of the project partners who travelled to the U.K. to join us. We were also fortunate enough to be able to arrange a visit to Bletchley Park as part of the proceedings.  read more...

AI for the Research Ecosystem workshop – #AI4RE

On March 22, 2024, the AI for the Research Ecosystem workshop (#AI4RE) took place in London, kindly hosted by UCL in the wonderful surroundings of Chandler House. The workshop was part of the Turing Institue’s AI UK Fringe series of events which took place around the U.K. The workshop focused on the intersection of the recent developments in Artificial Intelligence, such as Large Language Models and Deep Learning, and how these developments will impact current research practices. 

The packed programme opened with a keynote by Prof. David De Roure of the University of Oxford, exploring knowledge infrastructures, social machines and how, and if,  we can measure the rate of innovation – and whether it is increasing.  read more...

CORE Board of Supporters Meeting round up

This week saw the 2nd bi-annual CORE Board of Supporters Meeting take place online. The meeting was well attended and we are extremely pleased that 24 participants from 15 member institutions joined us. The Board of Supporters is an integral component of the CORE governance structure and exists as part of our role as signatories to The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructures (POSI).

Figure 1: The CORE governance structure

Covered in the meeting were many of the latest developments that CORE has been working on including the conversion of PDF documents to structured text to allow for machine-readability, detecting duplicates and different versions of scholarly documents within repositories., we’re extremely grateful to Kirsten Vallee from The University of Chicago who spoke about her repository’s experience using the CORE Dashboard deduplication module.  read more...

CORE at Open Repositories 2024 

This summer the 19th annual Open Repositories Conference will take place from June 3rd to 6th at the Clarion Post Hotel in Gothenburg, Sweden. Over 300 submissions were received this year and the CORE team will be in attendance, presenting several areas of the work we have been undertaking over the last few months. 

We will be introducing our work as coordinators for the SoFAIR (Making Software FAIR: A machine-assisted workflow for the research software lifecycle) project, a two-year CHIST-ERA funded project which will improve and semi-automate the process for identifying, describing, registering and archiving research software.  read more...

How the Oxford University Research Archive (ORA) uses the CORE API

Jason Partridge – Open Access Service Manager at the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford.

One of the fundamental functions of CORE is to support Open Access. One of the most effective ways to achieve this is through automated data gathering, using the CORE API. CORE harvests and aggregates information of research papers collected from institutional and subject repositories, and from open access and hybrid journals, and makes the content available via an API (Application Programming Interface). The CORE API offers a wealth of metadata and full text content from its many data providers. read more...

Rioxx V3.0 Integration for DSpace Repositories

With the rollout of the Rioxx V3 metadata schema, repositories can benefit from far richer metadata for their articles. Since the release of the updated schema, The University of Cambridge has been working to develop an implementation of a RIOXX v3 OAI-PMH endpoint for DSpace-based repositories which will greatly simplify the adoption of this metadata schema. The Cambridge team submitted their code to DSpace for review and this has now been approved and will be released in May 2024 meaning every institution using DSpace can benefit from this important development. read more...

AI for the Research Ecosystem: a KMi workshop at the AI UK Fringe 2024

CORE is a part of The Knowledge Media Institute (KMi) here at The Open University. As part of the Turing Institute’s AI UK Fringe event series, Professor Petr Knoth and Dr David Pride from CORE are working together with Professor Enrico Motta and Dr Angelo Salatino from KMi and Dr Aldo Lipani from UCL to organise the “AI for the Research Ecosystem” (AI4RE) workshop which will highlight the rapid evolution of AI and its significant impact on the entire research process.

Technologies like deep learning and large language models are poised to transform various stages of research, including study design, literature reviews, code design, data collection and analysis, dissemination, peer review, and research assessment. The workshop aims to provide insights from expert speakers across the research spectrum, involving researchers, institutions, policymakers, funders, and commercial entities. The event serves as a catalyst for addressing fundamental questions about the implications of AI developments for the research community, emphasizing the need for responsible and ethical AI design and usage. Additionally, the workshop aims to explore how stakeholders can best organize and democratize these AI technologies for the benefit of the research ecosystem. read more...

CORE invited to UNESCO workshop on ‘Building an Open Science Monitoring Framework with open technologies’

Professor Petr Knoth, founder and team lead for CORE was recently invited to participate in a workshop entitled ‘Building an Open Science Monitoring Framework with open technologies’ hosted by UNESCO at their Paris headquarters. 

With many public and funder policies now mandating Open Access deposit of funded research, the need for tracking and measuring the impact of these policies becomes more pressing. This international workshop brought together more than 50 experts from research organisations, universities, nonprofits and national agencies to discuss how open technologies can best help in this effort and work towards monitoring the progress of open science itself.  read more...

University of Chicago adopts CORE’s article deduplication tool

CORE’s unique position with a global view of all open repositories enables us to work closely with its member organisations to develop and deliver tools that benefit repositories and repository managers. CORE recently introduced the new CORE Dashboard Versions and Duplicates module which provides a simple interface for identifying versions and duplicates in a repository. The system identifies different versions of articles and enables side-by-side reviewing. The different versions can then be marked using the widely used NISO Journal Article Versions (JAV) taxonomy. You can read a full overview of the new module in this recent blog post. read more...

CORE introduces comprehensive new guide for Data Providers

For a data provider, being indexed by CORE is a straightforward process as indexing is done via OAI-PMH which is a standard protocol for repository interoperability. Most common repository platforms such as EPrints, DSpace or Open Journal Systems (OJS) support OAI-PMH. There are however several additional stages that can be undertaken to ensure the repository is best configured to enable CORE to index the repository’s content to maximum effect. 

In an ongoing effort to help our Data Providers, CORE has introduced a detailed new guide that provides a wealth of information for repository managers and others. The new guide covers everything including how the repository should be configured for OAI-PMH. It is, sadly, a fairly common problem that the OAI-PMH endpoint of a repository  is misconfigured or not functional. This can occur even when other functionalities of the repository appear to be working without issues. This has a huge impact on how visible the repository is to the outside world, and subsequent ramifications for the discoverability of its content. read more...