CORE becomes the world’s largest open access aggregator (or how about them stats 2018 edition)

This was another productive year for the CORE team; our content providers have increased, along with our metadata and full text records. This makes CORE the world’s largest open access aggregator. More specifically, over the last 3 months CORE had more than 25 million users, tripling our usage compared to 2017. According to Alexa CORE is now the 5,448th most used website globally. (Alexa rank is calculated from a combination of daily visitors and page views on a website over a 3-month period.) To put this into perspective, this shows that CORE is by far one of the most used Open Access Infrastructure services globally and its usage is higher than that of many large institutions. read more...

Increasing the Speed of Harvesting with On Demand Resource Dumps

I am currently working with Martin Klein, Matteo Cancellieri and Herbert Van de Sompel on a project funded by the European Open Science Cloud Pilot that aims to test and benchmark ResourceSync against OAI-PMH in a range of scenarios. The objective is to perform a quantitative evaluation that could then be used as evidence to convince data providers to adopt ResourceSync. During this work, we have encountered a problem related to the scalability of ResourceSync and developed a solution to it in the form of an On Demand Resource Dump. The aim of this blog post is to explain the problem, how we arrived to the solution and how the solution works. read more...

CORE’s Open Access content has reached the Moon! (or how about them stats 2017 edition)

For yet another year (see previous years 2016, 2015) CORE has been really productive; the number of  our content providers has increased and we have now more open access full text and metadata records than ever.

Our services are also growing steadily and we would like to thank the community for using the CORE API and CORE Datasets.

We also offer other services, such as the CORE Repositories Dashboard, CORE Publisher Connector and the CORE Recommender. We received great feedback with regards to the CORE Recommender, with George Macgregor, Institutional Repository Manager at Strathclyde University, reporting: read more...

Implementing the CORE Recommender in Strathprints: a “whitehat” improvement to promote user interaction

by George Macgregor, Institutional Repository Coordinator, University of Strathclyde

This guest blog post briefly reviews why the CORE Recommender was quickly adopted on Strathprints and how it has become a central part of our quest to improve the interactive qualities of repositories.

Back in October 2016 my colleagues at the CORE Team released their Recommender plugin. The CORE Recommender plugin can be installed on repositories and journal systems to recommend similar scholarly content. On this very blog, Nancy Pontika, Lucas Anastasiou and Petr Knoth, announced the release of the Recommender as a: read more...

CORE reaches a new milestone: 75 million metadata and 6 million full text

CORE is continuously growing. This month we have reached 75 million metadata and 6 million full of text scientific research articles harvested from both open access journals and repositories. This past February we reported 66 million metadata and 5 million full text articles, while at the end of December 2016 we had just over 4 million full text. This shows our continuous commitment to bring to our users the widest possible range of Open Access articles.

To celebrate this milestone, we gathered the knowledge of our data scientists, programmers, researchers, and designers to illustrate our portion of metadata and full text with a less traditional (sour apple) “pie chart”. read more...

CORE listed Number 1 in the list of top 21 free online journal and research databases

Image from the Scribendi website, 101 Free Online Journal and Research Databases for Academics.

An online editing and proofreading company, Scribendi, has recently put together a list of top 21 freely available online databases. It is a pleasure to see CORE listed as Number 1 resource in this list. CORE has been included in this list thanks to its large volume of open access and free of cost content, offering 66 million of bibliographic metadata records and 5 million of full-text research outputs. Our content originates from open access journals and repositories, both institutional and disciplinary and can be accessed via our search engine. In addition, we also offer an API and Datasets for programmable access to this content, enabling the development of new artificial intelligence-based applications for scientists and for carrying out text and data mining of scientific literature. read more...

CORE’s open access and text mining services – 2016 growth (or, how about them stats – 2016 edition)

The past year has been productive for the CORE team; the number of harvested repositories and our open access content, both in metadata and full-text, has massively increased. (You can see last year’s blog post with our 2015 achievements in numbers here.)

There was also progress with regards to our services; the number of our API users was almost doubled in 2016, we have now about 200 registered CORE Dashboard users, and this past October we released a new version of our recommender and updated our dataset. read more...

Analysing ORCID coverage across repositories through CORE

* This post was authored by Matteo Cancellieri, Petr Knoth and Nancy Pontika.

Last month, CORE attended the JISC ORCID hackday events in Birmingham and London. (ORCID is a non-profit organisation that aims to solve the author disambiguation problem by offering unique author identifiers). Following the discussions that sparked off at the two events, we decided to test the CORE data towards ORCID’s API and we discovered some information that we think is of interest to the scholarly community. read more...

‘Measuring’ and managing mandates

An investigation by Research Support staff at Brunel University London considers the role CORE might play in supporting funder compliance and the wider transition to open scholarship…

By David Walters (Open Access officer at Brunel) and Dr Christopher Daley (Research Publications Officer at Brunel)

In 2001, the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) brilliantly and simply encapsulated the aspirational qualities of ‘openness’ that funders, scholars, institutions, services and publishers have since driven forward. This simplicity has been lost in the detail of implementing funder mandates over copyright restrictions, resulting in significant administrative overheads to support staff whose primary role is to smoothly progress a cultural change. Although the momentum is undeniable, the transition to open scholarship is now fraught with complexity. read more...