CORE celebrates PhD. viva success for Suchetha Nambanoor-Kunnath

The whole CORE team were delighted last week when our very own Suchetha Nambanoor-Kunnath successfully defended her PhD thesis, titled: “Language Models for Citation Classification”. Her PhD topic focused on large language models for citation classification and how this can impact several areas including research evaluation, literature discovery and summary generation. 

Suchetha’s panel was chaired by Prof. Bart Rienties, while Professors Enrico Motto, from KMi, and Silvio Peroni, from the University of Bologna, were her two examiners. Prof. Silvio Peroni commented that he was particularly impressed with the literature review, which was published as a stand-alone piece of work in the Journal of Qualitative Scientific Studies this past December.  read more...

Identifying and extracting authors’ Rights Retention Statements from full text academic articles

CORE has been working closely with our member institutions to co-create the design and functionality for a new module that can assist with the discovery and management of authors’ Rights Retention statements for published works. 

The problem

A Rights Retention Statement is a declaration by an author that they retain certain copyright rights to their scholarly work, even when they sign a publication agreement with a journal publisher. This statement is often used to ensure that authors can comply with open access mandates from funding agencies, such as those under Plan S, which require that the research they fund be made freely available to the public. Under Plan S, the Rights Retention strategy is a significant aspect because it aims to ensure that authors retain copyright on their articles, even when they publish in subscription journals.  read more...

US Repository Network launches pilot with CORE to enhance discoverability of Open Access  content in repositories.

An interoperable and well-functioning network of repositories is an essential component of US national research infrastructure and will play a crucial role in creating a more open and equitable global scholarly communications system. With the advent of the recent OSTP Memorandum requiring Ensuring Free, Immediate, and Equitable Access to Federally Funded Research, there is a need to help repositories identify tools and practices to ensure that they can become an effective compliance option for this policy  read more...

UKCoRR Members’ Day – CORE Panel Session

The UKCoRR Members’ Day took place on November 13th and, at very short notice, was held online due to the ongoing technical problems currently being experienced by The British Library, who were the original hosts for the day long event.

Our panel session, entitled “CORE, repositories and supporting UKRI OA Policy” saw substantial participation with more than 120 people from U.K. HEIs in attendance. The session opened with a presentation from Professor Petr Knoth, Head of CORE. This presentation detailed CORE’s recent advancements and developments planned for the coming months, with the focus on how the tools and services being built by CORE can best serve the repository communities’ needs, with particular regard to the UKRI’s Open Access policy. read more...

Detecting duplicate records and manuscript versions in your repository

There are many reasons why a repository may end up with multiple copies of an article, for example, having the author’s original manuscript and the final post-review copy is a common scenario of near-duplicate content. Another example might be when multiple co-authors deposit the same manuscript without being aware of each other. Detecting (near-)duplicates and distinguishing them from different versions of the same article is both challenging and time-consuming. We have seen that a typical repository will have hundreds of duplicates and near-duplicate records, signifying the scale of this issue. read more...